Hip Replacement Recalls

Lawsuits for patients that have received hip implants are on the rise.  Potential lawsuits are being investigated for people that have received DePuy, Stryker, and Zimmer hip replacements.  

DePuy ASR Hip Replacement 

 

DePuy Orthopaedics issued a global recall of the ASR Hip Resurfacing System and ASR Acetabular System in August 2010 after data from the National Joint Registry of England and Wales showed that 1 out of every 8 patients (12%-13%) who had received the devices had to undergo revision surgery within five years of receiving it.

DePuy's metal-on-metal hip causes severe complications when the metal acetabular and femoral components rub against one another. Lawsuits pending in the DePuy ASR hip implant litigation allege that when these parts rub together they can shed metal ions which may be absorbed into the bloodstream and local tissue. This phenomenon can result in premature failure of the implant, the development of pseudotumors, soft tissue reaction, metallosis, and pain.



Even if you have not yet suffered complications from your DePuy hip replacement, we strongly encourage you call today to see what rights you have.

Stryker Orthopaedics - July 2012

​​

While still deep in litigation from a previous recall of their Trident line of hip replacements, in July 2012, Stryker issued a voluntary recall of their Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck hip implant systems.  These hip implants share similar design with the DePuy ASR in that they are metal-on-metal.



The same familiar concerns arise with these hip implants.  Due to the release of dangerous metal particles into the local tissue surrounding the implant, adverse reactions and side effects are very common and dangerous.



Even if you have not yet suffered complications from your Stryker hip replacement, we strongly encourage you call today to see what rights you have.



 

 

Zimmer Durom Cup Recalled


On July 24, 2008, Zimmer Holdings Inc. publicly announced suspension of all marketing and sales of its Durom Acetabular Hip Component, also known as the Durom Cup.  More than 12,000 Durom Cups were implanted starting in 2006 and sources say that at least 10% of them have failed already.  



The most common failure of the Durom Cup is cup loosening which requires a complete revision surgery.  



Because most patients are not aware of the exact implant that was used, patients are encouraged to have their case investigated if they have had any problems since the implant or believe they received a Durom Cup.